RETURN TO HOMEPAGE - ENTOMORESIN.COM

RHINOCYPHA FENESTRATA CORNELLI

Embedded in clear epoxy resin

CLICK HERE TO FIND & BUY THE GREATEST INSECTS CASTING

rhinocypha_0.jpg (2459046 bytes) rhinocypha_1.jpg (2506606 bytes) rhinocypha_2.jpg (2326359 bytes)
rhinocypha_3.jpg (2232812 bytes) rhinocypha_4.jpg (2472790 bytes) rhinocypha_5.jpg (2432128 bytes)
rhinocypha_6.jpg (6934584 bytes) rhinocypha_7.jpg (2463961 bytes) rhinocypha_8.jpg (2434943 bytes)

---------------------------------

Classification

KINGDOM : Animalia

PHYLUM : Arthropoda

CLASS : Insecta

ORDER : Odonata

SUBORDER : Zygoptera

FAMILY : Chlorocyphidae

GENUS : Rhinocypha

SPECIES : R. fenestrata cornelli

..............................

RHINOCYPHA FENESTRATA CORNELLI

Rhinocypha is a genus of damselflies in the family Chlorocyphidae. Small but robust damselflies (most species with head, thorax, and abdomen 20-30 mm in length), with the abdomen distinctly shorter than the wings when at rest. Most species have a pronounced 'nose' or rostrum formed by the clypeus, which projects conspicuously before the frons and compound eyes. There is only one genus in the Papuan region.

Chlorocyphidae (damselflies; order Odonata, suborder Zygoptera) Family of damselflies which can be identified by the many antenodal veins on the wings. The insects are often very colourful, and fly by streams or rivers in shady areas. In the larva, the medial tracheal gill is reduced to a spike. The family occurs in the Old World tropics. More than 230 extant species have been described.

The glittering -jewel- Family is best represented in Asia and Africa and contains some of the world's most colourful damselflies. The Family is also distinctive by way of the wings being longer than the body. The genus Rhinocypha extends from India, Japan, Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia, to New Guinea and north eastern Australia. It is represented by almost 60 species. The metallic wing tints have a strong strobing effect and appear to disappear as the viewer's angle changes.

Rhinocypha typically frequent stony, riffly streams with clear water, though they can be found on slow streams as well. They fly in open sunny areas and perch on overhanging twigs and foliage, or on rocks near the water's edge. Here the males catch the sunlight on their iridescent wings, which they open and close in precise wing- clapping rhythms to attract mates or intimidate conspecific rivals. Females also frequent exposed situations (though they are seen less often than the males), where they oviposit in partially-submerged rotting wood. Females will be best identified by association with males collected at the same locality. In most cases female thoracic patterns will closely approximate those of their respective males, with the blue colour of the males replaced by tan.

The different species and subspecies can be difficult to tell apart, but most of them exist in non-overlapping geographic ranges.


RETURN TO HOMEPAGE - ENTOMORESIN.COM

SHARE THIS SITE WITH A FRIEND