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SAIVA CARDINALIS
PLANTHOPPER
EMBEDDED IN CASTING RESIN

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Classification

Phylum Arthropoda

Class Insecta

Order Phasmatodea

Infraorder Fulgoromorpha

Family Fulgoridae

Subfamily Fulgorinae

Genus Saiva

Species S. Cardinalis

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SAIVA CARDINALIS
Saiva cardinalis is a species of lantern bug in the genus Saiva, fuldoridae. Found to the North-East of India (Darjiling, Sikkim), Nepal and Vietnam.

They are colourful insects, marked boldly in red, blue, white and black, with a prominent slender stalk like structure arising on the head that points upwards or forward.

The family Fulgoridae is a large group of hemipteran insects, especially abundant and diverse in the tropics, containing over 125 genera worldwide. They are mostly of moderate to large size, many with a superficial resemblance to Lepidoptera due to their brilliant and varied coloration. Various genera and species are sometimes referred to as lanternflies or lanthorn flies, though they do not emit light.

The head of some species is produced into a hollow process (structure), resembling a snout, which is sometimes inflated and nearly as large as the body of the insect, sometimes elongated, narrow and apically upturned

A planthopper is any insect in the infraorder Fulgoromorpha in the suborder Auchenorrhyncha and exceeding 12,500 described species worldwide. The name comes from their remarkable resemblance to leaves and other plants of their environment and from the fact that they often hop for quick transportation in a similar way to that of grasshoppers. However, planthoppers generally walk very slowly so as not to attract attention. Distributed worldwide, all members of this group are plant-feeders, though surprisingly few are considered pests. The infraorder contains only a single superfamily, Fulgoroidea. Fulgoroids are most reliably distinguished from the other Auchenorrhyncha by two features; the bifurcate ("Y"-shaped) anal vein in the forewing, and the thickened, three-segmented antennae, with a generally round or egg-shaped second segment that bears a fine filamentous arista.


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